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Title: Designed for leisure living

Pages: 32 - 39

                        

Author: Alf Boe Jaakko Lintinen Jake Brown

Text: Designed for leisure living
These three buildings are each designed to meet individual holiday needs and are of interest to a country with a growing tourist industry. Alf Boe looks at a Norwegian holiday cottage; Jaako Lintinen describes a Finnish Sauna cabin; Jake Brown reports on an English hotel extension.
Prefabricated cottage
The Trybocottage, made by Trybo A/S in the Trysil forest and mountain district of southeast Norway, was designed in response to two needs. The first was to create more work in an area of depopulation. The other was to produce a holiday house which was easy to erect and would fit into the landscape, as part of a plan to develop tourism in the region.
The cottage itself was designed by Hans 0sterhaug of Arkitim, a firm of architects; his colleague Edvin Helseth,of the same firm, was responsible for the furniture and fittings. It is buiIt of fulIy insulated prefabricated sections on a onemetre module, 4 or 5 metres wide and 12 to 16 metres long, the smallest floor area being 4 metres x 12 metres. The structural material is spruce, the fixtures and furniture are of untreated pine; all the parts are based on the quality gradings of the local sawmill, suitable material first being sorted in the forest. All the production and assembly sequences are kept as uncomplicated as possible, taking into account the unsophisticated plant and machinery in Trysil which is operated by relatively unskilled labour. The widths of the components were determined by lorry capacity.
In order to keep down storage and assembly costs, the assembly is done by agents or customers. Fully finished components (the furniture packed in flat cases) can be stored on a lorry and trailer and, it is claimed, mounted ready for use in three days. The kitchen fittings and cupboards are held together by skirting and guide bars. Doors are reversible with hinge holes on both edges so that they can be made to open either way. Chairs and stools consist of frames held together by cross bars, the ends of which fit into the frame taps, secured by round wooden dowels. Without the furniture, but with all the fixed fittings, the cottage costs from 1025 for the simplest model.
The Trybo holiday house is constructed in spruce. It can be erected in three days either as a mountain cabin or seaside cottage.
Interior fittings are all in untreated pine. In the kitchen, left, different layouts of work surface and cupboard can be made from the same units. All the shelves are . adjustable and cup. board doors can hinge either from the left or the right.
The standard plan measures 4 metres x 12 metres, but the dimensions can be extended by intervals of 1 metre and different interior layouts are possible. The living area, lower left, is open plan, with one part for eating; the bedroom, opposite, is fitted with bunk beds.
In the Trybo cottage interior arrangement, left, the dining part of the living area is divided off from the kitchen by an open topped counter.
Trybo furniture was designed on a similar modular basis to the cottage, to make best use of the space. Designs are simple, using only right angles and straight lines, with frames held together by cross bars and secured by wooden dowels. All the furniture can be delivered packed flat in boxes. Details of | the adjustable arm- I chair, left, show the| standard finish.
Sybaritic sauna
To the Finns, life without a sauna bath is unthinkable. Almost every house in Finland even the meanest, is equipped with one as a matter of course. The intoxicating dry heat followed by the self-inflicted flagellation with birch twigs is good for the soul as well as the body and acts as an antidote to the long twilit days of the Finnish winter.
The sauna is usually custom built, tailored to fit inside the house. It was left to the flair and ingenuity of Marimekko, a firm best known for its swirling designs on fabrics and laminates (see DESIGN 236/28-31, 245/50, 53), to develop a sauna system that may be assembled out of doors and ready for use in the course of a single day. It can be easily and quickly dismantled, transported and then reconstructed. Marimekko are marketing a complete kit of parts - right down to towels and cakes of soap and their package has probably been aimed at the opulent hotel/ country club end of the market.
Designed by Aarno Ruusuvuori, the Marimekko sauna system is built up from rationalised components into three sections of equal volume: the loyly room, or heat room; the washroom; and the verandah. Four-section saunas including a dressing room are also obtainable. The unshielded verandah area can easily be protected by means of sailcloth walls which are attached at the floor and ceiling with rings and clips. Thermal glass walls and door separate - and insulate - each section from the other and the entry point can be placed either to the right or the left of the structure.
The basic kit of parts breaks down into three identical asbestos-roofed units; three timber floor units; five wall panels; and two glass partitions fitted with connecting doors. The structure measures 7.5 metres x 2.4
metres x 2.4 metres and rests on two longitudinally placed timber foundation joists.
The timber work on the exterior of the sauna is treated pine painted blue or red, or left plain. The inner lining can be either normal pine, or obeche. In the Coyly room the floor boards, the slanting, slatted seat and bench are all finished in the smoother heat absorbent obeche. The washroom and the verandah are carpeted with coconut matting. All metal parts are brass to protect them against rust and door handles are covered with a thick twine net.
The pine version costs 1260, the obeche lined model some 100 more. In addition there is the oven made for Marimekko by Metalliteos Oy (50), sailcloth walls (80) and coconut matting (40) to be taken into account. Marimekko also, with characteristic thoroughness, have produced a "sauna package" (22) which includes bathrobes and towels in Maija Isola designed towelling, washbowls, pails, soap and brushes. Birch twins are not included.
Developed from a Remountable holiday house designed for Maija Isola by Aarno Ruusuvuori, the MarimeNko sauna can be run up in the course of a single day. A kit of parts, comprising wall panels, floor and roof in treated pine, is assembled into three equal sections heatroom, washroom and verandah - with an optional dressing room.
The view from the washroom, opposite, shows coconut matting on the verandah and slatted bench seating. Marimekho's sauna "package" includes washpails and patterned bathrobes. All door and cupboard handles, left, are covered with twine and the seating of the loyly or heat room, centre, is in heat absorbent obeche. The rest of the woodwork is pine. A glass partition divides the ventilated washroom, bottom, from the verandah.
Hotel that grows
A new wing, by Russell, Hodgson & Leigh with lan Hodgson as architect in charge, has been added to the Lygon Arms in Broadway, Worcestershire.
This is an interesting project because it shows what can be done in small medieval village to supply the accommodation tourists and visitors need without damaging what they have come to see. Although the booming tourist trade means there is a tremendous demand for more hotel rooms in Britain, we do not at the moment seem very good at hotel design. We have lost that sense of local-scale hospitality which saw us through from the late Middle Ages to the 18th century, as well as the l9th-century respect for scenery and panache of size and grandeur.
Today, technically, we are fully meeting the demand for modern facilities. But most of the buildings themselves rarely fit into their environment, and are inclined to glower down on the historic city centres which they are beginning to ring in increasing numbers. This may be all right for those using the hotels, but is not so pleasant for those (of course often the same people) who see them as part of the place itself. Coping with this phenomenon is important because we need more hotels, and in absolute terms there is certainly plenty of room for them.
There are three distinct parts of the Lygon Arms: the 15th to 18th century front facing the main road; the Garden Wing built in 1958; and the new wing. The Garden Wing, immaculately designed by Russell, Hodgson & Leigh, is well worth visiting in its own right, since it is one of the most complete buildings of its period, the overall concept following through from the architecture to the detailing the fittings, furniture, curtains and even the lithographs by artists like Paul Nash.
The new wing, which is connected by a timber-framed bridge giving direct access to the public rooms in the older building and a covered way below, has 19 new bedrooms on three floors, a conference room on the first floor, and a single-storey extension to the kitchen block.
The Lygon Arms has always been a successful inland conference centre, but the new conference room can take up to 80 people. The bedrooms all have their own bathrooms, bedside consoles with telephones and four-channel radios. Four of the rooms, two on the ground floor and two on the top, are interconnecting to make up into family units or larger suites.
The scale of the building is achieved by the cellular cross-wall construction and the use of the roughly squared old rubble stone in large panels with lead-trimmed timber box windows or doors. The ground floor rooms open direct out on to the courtyard garden. The site plan shows how the new block (shaded) faces the earlier Garden Wing extension, by the same firm of architects. Seen from the courtyard, below and far left, the new block's three storeys rise in steps, with a timber framed bridge baking them to the Garden Wing. The first-floor conference room, far left, opens onto a balcony. The link bridge, below right, is staggered halfway along, to avoid a claustrophobic corridor effect..
Key
1 New block
2 Original hotel
3 Garden Wing
4 Main kitchen
5 Kitchen extension
6 Bedroom
7 Entrance
8 Service access
9 Link bridge
10 Balcony
11 Conference room
12 Pre-drinks area
13 Special bedroom
14 Interconnecting bed room
The conference room, left, holds up to 80 people and has its own all-purpose film screen/blackboard. All built-In furniture in the hotel is by Gordon Russell Ltd and loose furniture is by Gordon Russell Contracts; metal garden furniture is by G N Burgess & Co Ltd. The conference room chandelier is by David Gillespie Associates.
Four of the bedrooms are inter-connecting, so that they can be made up into family units or suites. The photographs, left and lower left, show a bedroom and living room area in one of these double units.

 

 

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